Should you still get vaccinated?

The following story was written by a student on the staff of The Jaguar Times as part of Hilliard Bradley High School’s Journalism Production course.


Brayden Laslo,

Sports Editor

The CDC notes that "getting the vaccine is the best way to protect yourself and others around you, especially as the more contagious Delta variant spreads around the country". Photo Credit: Unnsplash.com
The CDC notes that "getting the vaccine is the best way to protect yourself and others around you, especially as the more contagious Delta variant spreads around the country". Photo Credit: Unnsplash.com

Covid-19 is far from over and the majority of people across the United States have had an encounter with the virus by now. That’s the main reason why people are getting vaccinated but for others they’ve had the virus and still are refusing to get vaccinated. Students have the right to their own opinion and that’s the most important thing when it comes to personal decisions.


“If you have had COVID-19 before, please still get vaccinated,” said CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky. “This study shows you are twice as likely to get infected again if you are unvaccinated. Getting the vaccine is the best way to protect yourself and others around you, especially as the more contagious Delta variant spreads around the country.” The study of COVID was done by hundreds of Kentucky residents with previous infections through June 2021 found that those who were unvaccinated had 2.34 times the odds of reinfection compared with those who were fully vaccinated. The findings suggest that among people who have had COVID-19 previously, getting fully vaccinated provides additional protection against reinfection. Additionally, a second publication from MMWR shows vaccines prevented


COVID-19 related hospitalizations among the highest risk age groups. As cases, hospitalizations, and deaths rise, the data in today’s MMWR reinforce that COVID-19 vaccines are the best way to prevent COVID-19. COVID-19 vaccines remain safe and effective. They prevent severe illness, hospitalization, and death. Additionally, even the uncommon cases of COVID-19 among the fully or partially vaccinated. Vaccines make people more likely to have a milder and shorter illness compared to those who are unvaccinated. CDC continues to recommend everyone ages 12 and older get vaccinated against COVID-19.


Studies touting the durability and strength of natural immunity are hobbled by one crucial flaw. They are, by definition, assessing the responses only of people who survived COVID-19. The road to natural immunity is perilous and uncertain, Nussenzweig said. “Only 85% to 90% of people who test positive for the virus and recover have detectable antibodies to begin with. The strength and durability of the response is variable.” For example, while the immunity gained from vaccines and infection is comparable among younger people, two doses of the mRNA vaccines protected adults older than 65 better than a prior infection did.


The Jag times interviewed some Jags on their take on whether you should be getting vaccinated even if you had the virus. “I personally don’t have the vaccine due to my family but I would love to get it eventually” (Alana Bridges 11). “I have the vaccine and I had the virus so I’m glad I ended up getting it due to the fact that I was in a lot of distress when I had the virus” (Max Hockman 11). “I don’t have the vaccine due to possible side effects and I’ve already the virus so I don’t feel like I need the vaccine” (Grace Markusic 11). All of these opinions are valid so all Jags should respect them even if you disagree with them.


Overall the CDC suggests you still get the vaccine even if you had the virus, but if you’ve had the virus already your body had built immunity and therefore the vaccine would just be adding extra protection for you. Ask someone if they’re vaccinated. It’s a hard question to ask but the answer is even harder due to everyone’s different view on the subject.


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